Living in Spain and bringing up a Spanglish family during the current 'crisis' and trying various ways to make some 'dinero'. Enjoying life in the sun, crafting and blogging as much as possible.

17 Apr 2012

Chris Stewart - Driving over Lemons

CHRIS STEWART (source)

Chris-Stewart


Chris Stewart shot to fame with Driving Over Lemons in 1999. Funny, insightful and real, the book told the story of how he bought a peasant farm in a remote valley in Andalucia – sited on the wrong side of the river, with no water or electricity, and with its previous owner still in residence. The book became an international bestseller, along with its sequels, A Parrot in the Pepper Tree and The Almond Blossom Appreciation Society.
In an earlier life, Chris was the original drummer in Genesis (he played on the first album – he’s the one on the far right, pouting, next to Peter Gabriel), then joined a circus, learnt how to shear sheep, went to China to write the Rough Guide, gained a pilot’s license in Los Angeles, and competed a course in French cooking. His most recent book, Three Ways to Capsize a Boat, fills in his lost years skippering a yacht in the Greek islands and then crossing the North Atlantic.


Chris posts an amusing and erratic blog about life on his farm, El Valero, where he continues to live, along with his wife Ana and a menagerie of cats, dogs, chickens and sheep.

DRIVING OVER LEMONS (source)

A funny, generous, wonderfully written account of an family making a life and home in remote but enchanting southern Spain.

At seventeen, Chris Stewart, the first drummer for the rock group Genesis, left the band and launched a career that included stints as a sailor, a sheep shearer, and a travel writer. And he has no regrets.

If he'd become a rock star, he might never have moved with his wife, Ana, to El Valero, a mountain farm in Andalucía, Spain, studded with olive, almond, and lemon groves -- but with no access road, water supply, or electricity. He might never have forged the friendship of a lifetime with his resourceful neighbor Domingo. He might never have had the adventures that resulted in both hilarious disasters and blissful serendipity. He might never have experienced the satisfying complexity of a simple life lived in one of Europe's most beautiful regions, among peasants, farmers, ex-pats, New Age travelers, and a growing family, or come to understand a place and its people with such depth and affection. And certainly Stewart, the eternal optimist, would never have written this delectable book and made us his utterly captivated audience.

 

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