Living in Spain and bringing up a Spanglish family during the current 'crisis' and trying various ways to make some 'dinero'. Enjoying life in the sun, crafting and blogging as much as possible.

28 Mar 2012

The Baking Co-operative - Scotch Eggs

I have just been enjoying one of our latest requests 'Scotch Eggs' (made with free range eggs from our chickens)

Made by Sally @ The Baking Co-operative


ABOUT (by Wikipedia)

Origin
The London department store Fortnum & Mason claims to have invented Scotch eggs in 1738, but they may have been inspired by the Moghul dish nargisi kofta ("Narcissus meatballs").
The earliest printed recipe is the 1809 edition of Mrs. Rundell's A New System of Domestic Cookery. Mrs. Rundell - and later 19th-century authors - served them hot, with gravy.

Serving
Scotch eggs are usually a picnic food and home-made. In the UK, pre-packed, plastic-wrapped Scotch eggs are commonly available in supermarkets, convenience stores and motorway service stations.
Miniature versions of Scotch eggs are also widely available in British supermarkets, and are sold under the name 'savoury eggs', 'picnic eggs', 'party eggs', 'snack eggs' or similar. These contain chopped egg or a quail's egg, rather than a whole chicken egg, and sometimes contain mayonnaise or chopped bacon.
In the United States, many "British-style" pubs and eateries serve fresh-made Scotch eggs. These are usually served hot, with dipping sauces such as ranch dressing, hot sauce, or hot mustard sauce. At the Minnesota State Fair, true to fair tradition, Scotch eggs are served on a stick.
In West Africa, some fast-food restaurants offer Scotch eggs alongside their other menu items. In Nigeria, Tantalizers and Mr. Biggs both prominently feature Scotch eggs.
In the Netherlands and Belgium, Scotch eggs may also be called vogelnestje 'little bird's nest' because they contain an egg.

Variations and similar foodstuffs
Several local variations exist, such as the "Manchester egg" which uses a pickled egg wrapped in a mixture of pork meat and Lancashire black pudding, and the Worcester Egg, where the egg is first pickled in Worcestershire Sauce and then clad in a mixture of local sausagemeat and white pudding.
In the Netherlands a similar snack item called an eierbal is served hot at greasy spoon ("snackbar") type establishments, mostly in the Northern and Eastern Netherlands.

RECIPE (from BBC Good Food)

Scotch eggs
Homemade Scotch eggs are a world away from shop bought versions. They're worth the effort for a special picnic treat.

Ingredients

  • 4 large free-range eggs
  • 275g/10oz sausage meat
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 spring onion, very finely chopped
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 125g/4oz plain flour, seasoned with salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 free-range egg, beaten
  • 125g/4oz breadcrumbs
  • vegetable oil, for deep frying

Preparation method

  1. Place the eggs, still in their shells, in a pan of cold salted water.
  2. Place over a high heat and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to simmer for exactly nine minutes.
  3. Drain and cool the eggs under cold running water, then peel.
  4. Mix the sausage meat with the thyme, parsley and spring onion in a bowl and season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper (be generous with the freshly ground black pepper).
  5. Divide the sausage meat mixture into four and flatten each out on a clean surface into ovals about 12.5cm/5in long and 7.5cm/3in at its widest point.
  6. Place the seasoned flour onto a plate, then dredge each boiled egg in the flour.
  7. Place each onto a sausage meat oval, then wrap the sausage meat around each egg. Make sure the coating is smooth and completely covers each egg.
  8. Dip each sausage meat-coated egg in the beaten egg, rolling to coat completely, then dip and roll into the breadcrumbs to completely cover.
  9. Heat the oil in a deep heavy-bottomed pan, until a breadcrumb sizzles and turns brown when dropped into it. (CAUTION: hot oil can be dangerous. Do not leave unattended.)
  10. Carefully place each scotch egg into the hot oil and deep-fry for 8-10 minutes, until golden and crisp and the sausage meat is completely cooked.
  11. Carefully remove from the oil with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper.
  12. Serve cool.


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